20 Warning Signs Your Relationship is Emotionally Abusive

This happened to me the other night. A dear friend and I were talking about our kids and how to help them transition from children to adults. The topic of dating and relationships came up and we started talking about my story. It somehow validates my belief that some of the teachings I grew up with were very wrong. Fear of loving and losing. Fear of making the wrong choice. Fear of getting hurt.

Signs of Emotional Abuse in Your Marriage

Instead, they involve mistreatment, disrespect, intense jealousy, controlling behavior, or physical violence. Abuse can be physical, emotional, or sexual. Physical abuse means any form of violence, such as hitting, punching, pulling hair, and kicking. Abuse can happen in both dating relationships and friendships.

Emotional abuse can be difficult to recognize.

Emotional abuse can have a lasting and devastating impact on your emotional health and sense of self, and it can take years to undo the damage. If you were emotionally abused as a child, or even in a later significant relationship, your self-esteem was affected as well as .

Physical and sexual abuse Physical abuse is the use of physical force against someone in a way that injures or endangers that person. Physical assault or battering is a crime, whether it occurs inside or outside of the family. The police have the power and authority to protect you from physical attack. Any situation in which you are forced to participate in unwanted, unsafe, or degrading sexual activity is sexual abuse. Forced sex, even by a spouse or intimate partner with whom you also have consensual sex, is an act of aggression and domestic violence.

Furthermore, people whose partners abuse them physically and sexually are at a higher risk of being seriously injured or killed. Recovering from Rape and Sexual Trauma:

Emotional Incest and The Relationship Avoidant

Domestic violence also called intimate partner violence IPV , domestic abuse or relationship abuse is a pattern of behaviors used by one partner to maintain power and control over another partner in an intimate relationship. Domestic violence does not discriminate. Anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion or gender can be a victim — or perpetrator — of domestic violence.

Emotional abuse, verbal abuse, and domestic violence are on the rise, especially among young people. The risk of falling into an abusive relationship is greater than ever.

We met online and we began this long and slow process of getting to know each other. Taking your time sounds prudent. Nonetheless, as a result of being in a relationship Adam was experiencing heightened [emotional and relational] distress and anxiety. Adam would soon discover that the issue of emotional incest or covert sexual abuse was and is at the foundation for his longstanding sense of suffocation; that which he experiences when in romantic relationships.

However, that awareness was not yet on our therapeutic horizon and still beyond the realm of his understanding. There are many areas of relational distress that warrant close scrutiny and certainly many more relational issues that bring individuals and couples to seek therapy. Being in a relationship is a fast, and at times, furious way to identify our relational strengths and shortcoming. While living alone on a mountain top with or without our favorite pet can be the surest bet to shield oneself from the inherent angst and ire that accompanies any relationship, we are social creatures at our core and at some point we might need to come down from the mountain in pursuit of companionship.

Nonetheless, the decision or indecision as it may be to let someone in becomes a step taken toward potential connection. Along with the potential for connection come the conscious and unconscious responses that accompany us from our earlier relational experiences beginning with and subsequent to our caregivers. Not until one shines a light can we see what is invisible yet so very present and all around us.

In turn, the child becomes the confidant or emotional spouse of a same- sex or opposite sex parent.

What is Relationship Abuse

Everything will start to make sense. Emotional abuse signifies this is no ordinary relationship. Naturally we do what normal people do in real relationships.

There are many different kinds of emotional abuse, and emotional abuse can take place within the context of all sorts of dating relationships, ranging from casual dating situations to very serious, monogamous, long-term relationships.

Dating Abuse Statistics Dating Abuse Statistics Young adult dating violence is a big problem, affecting youth in every community across the nation. Learn the facts below. Too Common Nearly 1. One in three adolescents in the U. One in 10 high school students has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend.

Why Focus on Young People? Girls and young women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rate of intimate partner violence — almost triple the national average. Violent behavior typically begins between the ages of 12 and The severity of intimate partner violence is often greater in cases where the pattern of abuse was established in adolescence. Long-lasting Effects Violent relationships in adolescence can have serious ramifications by putting the victims at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior and further domestic violence.

Being physically or sexually abused makes teen girls six times more likely to become pregnant and twice as likely to get a STI.

Emotional Abuse of Women by Male Partners: The Facts

Take the Emotional Abuse Test above. It will give you some indication of psychological and emotional abuse in your current relationship. Answer the questions based on what is currently happening in your relationship. As with all self-reporting surveys, there are inherent inaccuracies as well as other limitations. You can read more about this Emotional Abuse Test by following the reference link below. For the most accurate interpretation and help with your particular situation speak to a qualified relationship specialist that knows about abuse and violence.

Dating violence is physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal abuse from a romantic or sexual partner. It happens to women of all races and ethnicities, incomes, and education levels. It also happens across all age groups and in heterosexual and same-sex relationships.

If you are in immediate danger, please call Safety Alert Your computer use can be monitored by your abuser. Most libraries and some schools have computers for public use. If you are not from the Midcoast Maine area, here are some resources that may be of help to you: The following is a list of behaviors that may indicate a potential batterer. It is not the purpose of the listing to imply that every person with some of these attributes is a batterer or potential batterer.

Jealousy At the start of the relationship, an abuser will equate jealously with love. The abuser will question the victim about who the victim talks to, accuse the victim of flirting, or become jealous of time spent with others. The abuser may call the victim frequently during the day, drop by unexpectedly, refuse to let the victim work, check the car mileage, or ask friends to watch the victim. Controlling behavior In the beginning an abuser will attribute controlling behavior to concern for the victim for example, the victim’s safety or decision-making skills.

As this behavior progresses the situation will worsen, and the abuser may assume all control of finances or prevent the victim from coming and going freely. Quick involvement A victim often has known or dated the abuser for a brief period of time before getting engaged or living together.

Abuse Defined

Peace of mind 7. I never really let them into my life. If I do let them in, it is rare and they [will] have known me for years. It takes a long time [for me] to build trust. I explain why I bought something, why I did what I did, etc. I believe if someone offers me a hand, there will always be something they [want to] ask in return.

Teen Dating Violence [ KB, 2 Pages, ] is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional aggression within a dating relationship, including stalking. It can occur in person or electronically and might occur between a current or former dating partner.

What is dating abuse? Dating abuse is a controlling pattern of negative behaviors. Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime. Dating violence often starts with teasing and name calling. But these behaviors can lead to more serious violence like physical assault and rape. These behaviors include psychological, social, and emotional abuse, as well as physical and sexual violence. The goal of the abuser is to establish power over, and control of, the other person.

Dating abuse crosses all age groups, races, cultures, religions, educational and employment backgrounds. Emotional abuse can include name calling, highlighting perceived faults in your appearance, or personality. Social abuse is manipulation by your partner to dictate who you see, and meet, even who you email, and text.

Emotional Abuse: The Quiet Killer

Because, if you are like most people, you might be missing the red flags that you are in a relationship with an abuser. And slowly, steadily and irreversibly, emotional abuse — especially from someone who is supposed to love you — will erode your joy, your sense of well-being and even your mental health, driving you into paralyzing self-doubt, shame and possibly suicide.

And the hard truth is that the fact that you are reading this indicates that part of you already knows that you are in an abusive relationship… That despite the best face you are trying to put on things — and even despite the fact that your partner does do some good things for you — that you are profoundly unhappy. And that you know — deep inside — that you need to make a change in your life. Only then can you make a clear, informed decision, and live the life of self-worth and love that you deserve to live.

Emotional and verbal abuse may begin suddenly. Some abusers may start out behaving normally and then begin abuse after a relationship is established. Some abusers may purposefully give a lot of love and attention, including compliments and requests to see you often, in the beginning of a.

Share Does your partner put you down? If your partner continuously insults you or makes fun of you when you out in public, chances are he or she is an emotional manipulator. This kind of person will prey on your insecurities, but their tactics may not be overtly obvious. The person you are dating may simply ‘tease’ you in a way that makes your friends and family feel like you are in on the ‘joke’ when in reality you are hurt by their words.

For example, an emotional manipulator may know that you are feeling self-conscious about gaining a few pounds, yet instead of being supportive, they will call you out for having a third slice of pizza when you are hanging out with your friends. Beatty pointed out that women who grew up in a home where their families put them down grow used to this kind of dynamic, which is why we need to educate ourselves on what is really okay and what is not.

The psychotherapist, who is all about ‘personal responsibility’, asked: Your partner frequently diminishes your feelings and makes you feel like are overreacting 2. Your partner puts you down in front of your family and friends 3. Your partner blames you for their bad behavior 4. Your partner refuses to explain themselves, and often claims ‘you wouldn’t understand’ 5.

Lori Wick, Christian Author Involved in Child Abuse Probe

Covert emotional manipulation tactics are underhanded methods of control. Emotional manipulation methodically wears down your self-worth and self-confidence, and damages your trust in your own perceptions. It can make you unwittingly compromise your personal values, which leads to a loss of self-respect and a warped self-concept. With your defenses weakened or completely disarmed in this manner, you are left even more vulnerable to further manipulation.

A skilled emotional manipulator gets you to put your sense of self-worth and emotional well-being into their hands.

Emotional abuse can be a sneaky killer of the spirit – and worse. Why? Because, if you are like most people, you might be missing the red flags that you are in a relationship with an abuser. Chances are that you don’t want to see these red flags because you so desperately want to believe that.

Signs of Emotionally Abusive Men By: Sam Grover Emotional abuse is hard to identify because it is subtle and insidious. Rather than physically or verbally abuse someone, an emotionally abusive man will use a number of other strategies to make his target feel both worthless and bound to him. These include — but are not limited to — social isolation, financial restriction and essentially anything else hat makes someone more dependent on him than she has to be. Emotionally abusive men have short fuses and hair triggers Meet Singles in your Area!

Threatening Displays Emotional abuse hinges on threatening to do things rather than actually doing them. So, while a physically abusive man will actually hit, squeeze or otherwise assault his partner, an emotionally abusive man may just threaten to do these things. What’s more, he may threaten take children away, tell secrets or engage in other emotionally manipulative behavior. Emotional abusers control their partners through threats of actions rather than the actual actions themselves.

Consistently Chipping Away Emotionally abusive men do things consistently. Rather than destroy his partner’s self-esteem all at once, an emotionally abusive man will chip away at it until his partner forgets what it was like to have self-esteem in the first place, as she will have nothing to compare it to. He does this by constantly saying and doing little things such as telling his partner that nobody else could ever love her, criticizing her and otherwise needling at her in little ways that, when combined, destroy her self-esteem over time.

Controlling Behavior Emotionally abusive men also control their partners to isolate them from their families, communities and other social networks. A key example of this is controlling finances.

10 Gaslighting Signs in an Abusive Relationship


Greetings! Would you like find a sex partner? Nothing is more simple! Click here, free registration!